Savvy Senior Services
Anne Goldberg Motivational Speaker for Seniors

by Anne Goldberg, The Savvy Senior

It astounds me as to how many of my peers feel old.  I don’t relate to that at all.  In fact, I recently celebrated my 65th birthday.  While some of you may think, “Oh, she’s just a kid”, others – like my kids – think I’m older than dirt!  They actually call my friends, ‘the old people!’

What is remarkable to me though is that I cannot connect to what 65 is supposed to be.  It really is a matter of perspective, isn’t it?   How I choose to see myself, is just that… my choice.  In truth, I don’t see myself as any age.  I’m just me; the same me I’ve been since I can remember.  I do not define myself by any age and never have.  In fact, the Savvy Senior Mission Statement was born from my resistance to aging.  Every year I was old enough to have a past and young enough to have a future. And that sums up how I feel about every age.

I had my first son at 37 and my second was born when I was 41.  The classroom moms were all ten to fifteen years younger than I and yet we were in the same life stage.  Age was actually quite irrelevant.  We were all dealing with the same issues of bedtime, diapers, homework and after-school activities.  It leveled the age-playing-field.

Now, in my 65th year, I am embarking on a whole new adventure.  Leaving a relationship of almost ten years, I am moving from a 31-year love relationship with Broward County, Florida to new territory in Boca Raton.  Some would be devastated at this change.  Not me!  I see it as a blank page, ready for me to imprint with a whole new life with new experiences and accomplishments.  I can’t wait to spread my wings and see where the wind takes me.  I’m not entirely sure what awaits me in Palm Beach County.  I just know that it’s going to expand my world in ways I can’t even imagine right now.

How do you experience change?  Do you hide from it?  Do everything you can to avoid it?  Or do you embrace it with all the promise the future can hold?  Change offers the opportunity to start new; to look at your own self from a different perspective.  Change can mean new friends and new opportunities to learn and grow.  Of course it can be scary and challenging.  Anything new has those elements.  But rather than focus on the scary, concentrate on the adventure.  You never know what lies on the other side of change.

Be a Savvy Senior.  Consider change as a movement forward in your life.  No matter what that change may be, grab hold of it and ride it for all it’s worth!

 

Anne Goldberg, The Savvy Senior, has a mission to help seniors know they are old enough to have a past and young enough to have a future. Her vision is to create an army of senior volunteers bringing their wisdom and experience back to the community. She helps seniors live into their future with vitality by teaching them how to use computers; with conferences & workshops on The Art of Living Longer ; with decluttering & organizing; and with “Tell Your Story Videos”, preserving the stories & wisdom of your life for future generations.www.SavvySeniorServices.com
• (954) 536-8008

 

Does this sound familiar?  You get out of your car with your keys in your hand, pick up the mail, open the front door and then put everything down because the phone starts to ring, or some other distraction takes your attention.  Then, sometime later, when you are ready to leave the house again, you have no idea where you put your keys.

Whether it’s your wallet, purse, glasses, book or name your own, how much time do you spend looking for things you misplaced?  Oh the frustration. oh the fear… So many seniors worry they are losing cognitive awareness because they are always misplacing, or worse, losing things.  In most cases though, it is safe to say that you are not losing your mind.  What you have lost though is being in the present moment.  In the very moment when the phone starts to ring, if you can stay present to what is in your hands, you will most likely feel the keys and purposefully place them, rather than mindlessly drop them.  It might take a moment longer.  You might have to call the person back, or ask them to hold on while you stop and put things away. But you will know where your keys are!

Mindfulness is at play in all aspects of our health, and particularly when it comes to eating.  For example, let’s look at the simple act of eating a strawberry.  I can be aware that I am eating a strawberry and enjoy the flavor. But… when I take time to examine it first, I notice its bright pink color, the little black seeds and the contrast of the deep green stem; I savor the fragrance with its promise of sweetness and my mouth begins to water. I take my time as I bite into it and pay attention to the juice squirting into my mouth and down my chin, delicious and satisfying.  Chewing the fruit slowly and deliberately allows the flavor to fill my mouth and as I swallow I can feel it pass through my throat and down into my stomach.

You will find life a bit easier and food to be richer and more flavorful when you take time to savor the experience; when you are mindful of what is going on. And, mindful eating has the added benefit of chewing more slowly and thoroughly, which helps your stomach with digestion. And, you will likely eat less and be just as satisfied… so you could lose a few pounds as a bonus.

Be a Savvy Senior   Practice mindfulness and let me know what you discover.

Anne Goldberg, The Savvy Senior, is a Motivational Speaker and Longevity Coach. She has a mission to help seniors know they are old enough to have a past and young enough to have a future. Her vision is to create an army of senior volunteers bringing their wisdom and experience back to the community. She helps seniors live into their future with vitality by teaching them how to use computers; with conferences & workshops on The Art of Living Longer ; with decluttering & organizing; Kitchen Coaching to reduce Inflammation and “Tell Your Story Videos”, preserving the stories & wisdom of your life for future generations.www.SavvySeniorServices.com
• (954) 536-8008

 

by Anne Goldberg, The Savvy Senior

Most of us fear change.  It seems to be a very normal reaction to life.  The irony is that change, like death and taxes, is inevitable.  In fact, no matter what’s going on, we can count on the fact that something will change.  People in our lives, jobs, our physical abilities, the seasons – come in and out of our experience as regularly as we take each breath.  We resist change, but fear of the unknown can result in clinging to status quo behaviors – no matter how bad they are.  In the long run, rather than resist change, we might be well advised to embrace it.

If I had not changed my diet last year, I would be suffering with debilitating arthritis pain, in addition to life-stopping fatigue.  Was it easy? Heck no! I did not want to give up my favorite foods. I certainly did not want to start cooking more. But when I finally gave in to the change, the reward was far greater than the pain… literally, I no longer have pain in my hand and back. So when looking at change, it’s important to assess the pain/reward ratio.  It’s also important to take your time with the changes you can control, even the lifestyle changes that will help you live longer, happier and healthier.  Rather than big chunks of change, think of little bits of change.  One step at a time wins the race.

When applying this to a major life change such as downsizing and moving to a new home, it’s important to delve into the pain and the reward and to take your time with it.   The idea of going through EVERYTHING and choosing what to keep and what to toss (give away, donate or sell) can be daunting. But, and here’s where you have choice, you can see this differently.  Choosing to think about it as a fun way to pass time is the first step.  Under the right circumstances, it’s a trip down memory lane that will leave you with renewed memories and a sense of your life and loves. 

Parting with things – a harbinger of change – can be empowering.  I like to think that it’s time for someone else to enjoy this (fill in your own… jacket, set of dishes, furniture.)  By itemizing everything you donate, you can be eligible for a significant tax deduction and the satisfaction of knowing that your things will be put to good use in the future by people who want and appreciate them.  Like the artist, you need a clean canvas in order to create something new. Downsizing and removing the clutter accumulated over a lifetime creates space for new adventures and experiences. 

Are you ready to live the rest of your life up to your eyeballs in the past, or are you ready to embrace a new future – one with the promise of new experiences, friends, learning and meaning? Be a Savvy Senior and embrace change, because change can bring a whole new adventure to this third act of life.

Anne Goldberg, The Savvy Senior, has a mission to help seniors know they are old enough to have a past and young enough to have a future. Her vision is to create an army of senior volunteers bringing their wisdom and experience back to the community. She helps seniors live into their future with vitality by teaching them how to use computers; with conferences & workshops on The Art of Living Longer; with decluttering & organizing; and with “Tell Your Story Videos”, preserving the stories & wisdom of your life for future generations. For more information, contact me.

Irrespective of the changing laws surrounding medical marijuana, there is still a preponderance of people who don’t now, and never will, use these drugs.  The idea of using drugs is simply out of the question.  The irony is that these same people are likely to fall into the median group of Americans who consume about 175 pounds of sugar per year.  And now, research is beginning to show an alarming connection between the effects of added sweeteners and sugars on our brains and bodies.  And the stunning conclusion is that sugar is as addictive as cocaine!

In 2007 Australian researchers gave rats a choice between water sweetened with saccharine/glucose, or cocaine.  The rats showed a distinct preference for the sweetened water!  In prior tests, they chose cocaine over plain water.  The findings were further confirmed in a 2013 study from Connecticut College in which rats were given the choice of Oreos, morphine or cocaine. The study was designed to measure expression of a protein called c-Fos, a known marker of neuronal activation in the part of the brain that controls the feeling of pleasure. The result was alarming: Oreos beat out both drugs by a significant margin! Now I understand why peanut M&Ms are so annoyingly irresistible to me!

Like illegal drugs, large amounts of sugar can be very bad for you. In addition to obesity and diabetes, sugar can deeply affect your metabolism, impair brain function and make you more susceptible to heart disease and cancer. It can even form premature wrinkles.

In 2013, the New England Journal of Medicine published a Harvard study showing that above-normal blood sugar is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia – with or without diabetes. Research has also proved that there are many similarities in the brains of people with diabetes and the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. The good news here is that diabetes only remains a risk factor and not a sentence. A risk factor because we Savvy Seniors understand that lifestyle choices are responsible for 80-95% of all disease.

We know from the Blue Zones research that there is statistically less dementia, heart attacks, diabetes, strokes and cancer in those areas than in the United States. It always gets back to lifestyle.  Sugar is not the enemy.  Added sugar is the enemy.   Our bodies require sugar to function normally.

Rather than be discouraged, take this information as power. Now you know just how important it is to say no to excess sugar and even artificial sweeteners.  Enjoy sweet treats such as dried fruit, or fresh fruit in season.  Flavor your water with fresh fruit.  Move your body – walk, garden, do yoga. And most importantly, connect with others… get involved… for the true sweetness in life lies not in pie and cookies, but in our personal relationships and the connections we make with each other.

 

Anne Goldberg, The Savvy Senior, has a mission to help seniors know they are old enough to have a past and young enough to have a future. Her vision is to create an army of senior volunteers bringing their wisdom and experience back to the community. She helps seniors live into their future with vitality by teaching them how to use computers; with conferences & workshops on The Art of Living Longer ; with decluttering & organizing; and with “Tell Your Story Videos”, preserving the stories & wisdom of your life for future generations.www.SavvySeniorServices.com  • (954) 536-8008

August 26, 2016

The latest health newsletter from Harvard highlights three “trends worth tapping into.” They go on to say these three trends “fall into the ‘beneficial’ category” and are:  Wearing an activity tracker; Shopping at farmer’s markets and Practicing mindfulness.

Hmmm, sounds familiar! It’s so interesting how the most recent trends in health are just a modern throwback to the simple wisdom of the Blue Zones (www.BlueZones.com) and those who live the longest around the world. It is what The Art of Living Longer is all about.

More than 13 million of us are counting our steps with activity trackers. One of the great benefits to these devices is that there is a continual stream of feedback that can be accessed through your smart phone, tablet or computer. That feedback allows you to monitor just how much you are moving on any given day. You can set your own personal goals and allow the tracker to be your aide. They can be used to foster some friendly competition too … who among you will log in the most steps on any given day? Maybe the weekly winner is treated to a great, healthy dinner. Everyone wins with better health. The goal … 10,000 steps every day.

How do you add all those steps into your routine? Think like a Bluezoner. Garden, do some light housekeeping. Walk the dog several times a day. Go walking either alone with music on your Smart phone, or go with friends. Park your car further away. Shop at the mall or simply walk the mall where it’s cooler. Just remember, use it or lose it!

Farmer’s markets have long been known as the place for fresh, local produce and products. Blue Zoners fill 80% of their plates with food from plants – vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts and teas, plus local raw honey (which helps with seasonal allergies.) All of this is readily available at most farmer’s markets. We all know that the fresher the food, the more nutritious it is. Your local Farmer’s market offers a great outing. Make sure to wear your activity tracker and walk the market for extra health benefits.

The practice of mindfulness is 2500 years old, rooted in Buddhism, and not at all limited to monks. Mindfulness is, in my opinion, the single most important “trend” to embrace. Staying present, being in the moment, breathing deeply is the finest way to relax, have more fun with much less stress and to connect to the Divinity within. Being mindful somehow leads us to want to make better choices for our overall well-being.

Stress begins with a thought. When you have the skill to stop that thought and focus only on this very second in time and space, you will find your thinking mind quieting, bringing relief from the suffering that thought brought. Mindful breathing can halt an anxiety attack and relieve minor pain. It can help clear your mind and improve your focus. Mindfulness leads us to better choices of how we treat our bodies.

Be a Savvy Senior. Don’t stop moving. Eat fresh, whole, unprocessed foods and stay in the present moment. You’ll be amazed at what happens. Write in and let me know what changes you experience.

Anne Goldberg, The Savvy Senior, has a mission to help seniors know they are old enough to have a past and young enough to have a future. Her vision is to create an army of senior volunteers bringing their wisdom and experience back to the community. She helps seniors live into their future with vitality by teaching them how to use computers; with conferences & workshops on The Art of Living Longer ; with decluttering & organizing; and with “Tell Your Story Videos”, preserving the stories & wisdom of your life for future generations.www.SavvySeniorServices.com
• (954) 536-8008

 

The new norm with regards to nutrition seems to be the ages-old wisdom of Hippocrates: “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.”

The Harvard Medical school newsletter, in “Nutrition 101: Good Eating for Good Health”, makes the clear connection between diet and health. Within all the specifics they discussed, the one point they made is that “…good eating should not be considered a punishment, but an opportunity.” I couldn’t agree more.

By saying no to foods with green peppers, eggplant, white potatoes, pumpkin and tomatoes (so, pretty much good-bye Italian food L) my indigestion rarely raises its fiery head any more. And when it does, I can always trace it to something I’ve eaten. Given that OTC brands like Prevacid and Xantac inhibit the body’s ability to absorb nutrients, taking them only contributes to a lack of well-being.

So what do you do if you have indigestion? My sure-fire recipe is to chew three or four papaya enzyme pills (widely available at nutrition stores and on-line) with a chaser of 2 ounces of aloe vera juice. (I like OKC brand available at Wal-Mart and some Asian markets.) This combo’s like swallowing a fire extinguisher – without any negative side-effects. An added bonus with Aloe Vera is that it can work wonders for IBS sufferers.

Eating well yields huge rewards in the form of more energy, better sleep, nicer skin and an overall feeling of well-being. The people in the world who live the longest eat 75-80% vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts, legumes, some grains and just 0-20% animal protein. And they drink lots of green tea. How does your eating stand up to that?

When you pay attention to your body, during and after eating, you’ll become aware of signals it sends about the food you eat. Heartburn suggests intolerance to something you’ve eaten. Rather than medicating yourself, try and determine which food caused it and then eliminate this food from your repertoire and see if that makes a difference. Some foods cause inflammation and you may suddenly notice that one or more joints begin to ache. Some foods can cause a headache, or bloating, belching and other digestive issues. Sometimes you might wake up and your eyes and extremities are swollen. What did you eat the night before?

When you start to notice any tightening, bloating, swelling with 24 hours of eating something, you begin the process of understanding and mastering food’s powerful effects on how you feel. Then you become in control… and that is the opportunity.

Be a Savvy Senior. Start to notice a connection between certain foods and discomfort anywhere in your body and make decisions about what to eat based on foods that make you feel good.

Many seniors believe that they can’t really learn new things… a new language, a new habit or some hobby or game. This thought stops them from challenging themselves cognitively and in ways that will actually result in a better life experience. Overcoming obstacles, learning new things and continuing to grow and expand are hallmarks of the consciously aging senior. But what can be done about this pervasive idea that the aging brain has some kind of diminished power? You may be surprised to know that the science of Neuroplasticity debunks the idea that seniors can’t learn new things.

Neuroplasticity is the science that has proven that the brain is malleable, and can be affected by thought & blood flow. It teaches us that, when challenged, the brain changes itself to meet new demands. Nerve cells, called neurons, in our brains physically grow nerve endings to connect with other neurons when we learn new things! The more we experience and learn, the more connections are formed. And we know that any intervention that successfully prevents or slows decline will have positive effects, not only cognitively, but also in better gait and balance.1 as well as better overall mood and quality of life.

Noted motivational speaker Tony Robbins famously said, “When you stop growing, you start dying.” Learning is part of growing and is an essential component to healthy aging. So what’s the best way to learn something new? The keys are increasing blood flow and repetition. So take a walk, do some chair exercises… anything that will get your heart pumping just a bit faster than at rest.

When it comes to practicing something new, think back to when you first learned to drive a car. Did you know how to drive the SECOND time you got behind the wheel? Of course not, it took practice and lots of it before you were a really good driver. And it’s no different now with anything else you want to learn. You need practice to master a new skill – at any age.

Be a Savvy Senior. Tackle something new! First elevate blood flow and then start learning and then do it again. And again. And again! Repetition is the cement that holds those new memories in place.

Anne Goldberg, The Savvy Senior, has a mission to help seniors know they are old enough to have a past and young enough to have a future. Her vision is to create an army of senior volunteers bringing their wisdom and experience back to the community. She helps seniors reach their goals by teaching them how to use computers; conferences & workshops on The Art of Living Longer; Decluttering and Organizing; and “Tell Your Story Videos”, preserving the stories & wisdom of your life for future generations. www.SavvySeniorServices.com  • (954) 536-8008

1 Center for Research on Health & Aging at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Renae L. Smith-Ray